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Welcome Gift Horse Farm

Don’t Look a Gift Horse in the Mouth.

“No man ought to looke a geuen hors in the mouth.”

-John Heywood, 1546

Welcome to my blog! In 2015 my husband and I were gifted the family property outside Memphis, Tennessee and we set out to make it our home. We now reside on the property that we call “Gift Horse Farm” along with our 3 horses and 3 dogs. We are self proclaimed DIYers and have big dreams, join us as we chip away at our 40 acres and make it better than we found it.

Horse Run-In Shed

To begin our Horse Run-In Shed we headed to our local lumber yard and picked up the lumber and metal roof for the project and then to Lowe’s for lots and lots of screws.

The Run-In Shed measures 16′ wide and 12′ deep and is 12′ tall in the front and 8′ tall in the back with (4) 4’x4′ windows.

For this project we used:

  • (3) 4x6x12 treated posts (back posts)
  • (2) 4x6x16 treated posts (front posts)
  • (18) 2×6 treated (girts & rafters)
  • (7) 1×2 untreated (purlins)
  • (6) 16×3 corrugated metal sheets (roof)
  • (10) 4×8 treated plywood (siding & windows)
  • Deck screws
  • Roofing screws
  • 5 bags of Quikrete
  • Auger or posthole digger
  • Generator
  • Drill
  • Level
  • Sawzall
  • Circular Saw
  • Rotary Saw
  • Table Saw

Cece and Nero overseeing the construction.

My parents came over to help us get the project started. Digging the holes with the auger was exhausting so we were happy they were there to help with the process. Once the holes were dug it took 2 of us to get the posts in place and level while someone else poured the Quikrete. We did not add water to our Quikrete, simply pour the contents of the bag in the hole you dug, around the post. The rain and the moisture from the ground will wet the Quikrete and your posts will be more secure overtime.

Next we added the girts (side braces) to the posts and then the rafters and purlins to create the roof, the purlins are untreated because they will stay dry and are much lighter weight. At this point the structure is starting to take shape, but be aware that the structure will feel somewhat wobbly, until the entire roof is in place.

With all the girts (side braces) and roof installed the structure is secure and ready for siding.

Cece has plenty of room to go down a roll.

We added the sheets of plywood and left the Run-In Shed alone over the winter and came back to the project this summer to cut windows and trim it out. We used rough cut corral board left over from our fence and ripped them in half to end up with 3″ strips for the battens.

Me taking a break to admire our work.

The Final Product

Savannah and Nero enjoying the breeze and shade.

Eventually we will paint the Run-In Shed grey to match the front of the house, but that’s a project for another day, one that isn’t 92 degrees.

We added to screws to hold up the pitchfork for easy access.